A Quick Guide To Blaine, Washington

August 25, 2020

Blaine, Washington is a town with a population of 5,172. Located in Whatcom County, Blaine offers residents a sparse suburban feel and most residents own their homes. Many retirees live in Blaine and residents tend to lean conservative. The public schools in Blaine are above average. The city's northern boundary is the Canada--US border; the Peace Arch international monument straddles the border of both countries. The population was 4,684 at the 2010 census. Since Blaine is located right on the border with Canada, it is the northernmost city on Interstate 5, the southernmost being San Diego, California. Here's our quick guide if you ever wanted to visit:

Travel Guide to Blaine, Washington

Blaine, Washington is perfectly placed for the ultimate escape. In addition to a reputation for being an incredibly clean, safe town, Blaine glistens in natural beauty. Over a dozen parks are fit for bird watching, biking, and trailblazing, while a handful of manicured golf courses also add to an itinerary of outdoor recreation.

History of Blaine, Washington:

The area was first settled in the mid-19th century by pioneers who established the town as a seaport for the west coast logging and fishing industries, and as a jumping off point for prospectors going over to British Columbia's gold fields.

This town was officially incorporated on May 20, 1890, and was named after James G. Blaine (1830−1893), who was a U.S. senator from the state of Maine, Secretary of State, and in 1884, the unsuccessful Republican presidential candidate.

Blaine, Washington has a 'turn-of-the-century' theme, which can be spotted through the remodeled buildings and signs resembling designs that existed during the late 19th century and early 20th century.

The world's largest salmon cannery was started and conducted by the Alaska Packers' Association for decades in Blaine; the cannery site has been converted to a waterfront destination resort on Semiahmoo Spit.

Several saw mills once began on Blaine's waterfront, and much of the lumber was transported from its wharves and docks to help re-establish San Francisco following the 1906 fire there. The forests were soon logged, but Blaine's fishing industry kept up and stayed strong and robust into the second half of the 20th century.

Starting from the 1970s Blaine was home to hundreds of commercial purse seiners and gillnetters plying the waters offshore of British Columbia, between Washington state and southeast Alaska. The town's two large marinas are still home to hundreds of recreational sailboats and yachts, existent today and a small fleet of determined local fishers provide visitors with dockside sale of fresh salmon, crab and oysters.

People who love nature and such have always appreciated Blaine's coastal location, its accessible bike and walking trails, and view of mountains and water.

Birdwatchers too have discovered the area's high content of migratory birds and waterfowl: Blaine's Drayton Harbor, Semiahmoo Spit and Boundary Bay are ranked as Important Birding Areas by the Audubon Society.

The Cains are the most notable family in Blaine's short history, often mentioned with their founding and achievements. At one time owning most of present-day Blaine, the Cain brothers put up the biggest store north of Seattle, a lumber and shingle mill, a hotel (largest in the state at the time), the first public wharf, and donated large public tracts of land.

Nathan Cornish and family moved to Blaine in 1889 where he would go on to become mayor in 1901; his platform was 'twelve miles of wooden sidewalk'. His daughter, Nellie Cornish, having failed to open a successful piano teaching business in Blaine, moved to Seattle, where she founded the Cornish College of the Arts in 1914, which still exists today.

During the formative years of her career in the 1950s, country singer Loretta Lynn was often a featured star at Bill's Tavern on Peace Portal Drive in Blaine. William Hafstrom owned the tavern; it no longer exists. Loretty was then living on Loomis Trail Road near Custer, Washington.

Geography of Blaine, Washington:

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.43 square miles (21.83 km^2^), of which, 5.63 square miles (14.58 km^2^) is land and 2.80 square miles (7.25 km^2^) is water.

Blaine's motto is 'Where America Begins'.

Another motto for the community is known as 'The Gateway to the Pacific Northwest', and the 'Peace Arch City'.

All these phrases are commentaries on Blaine's unique location and community.

Blaine, Washington lies at the northernmost point of the north-south U.S. Interstate 5 and next to Drayton Harbor and Boundary Bay. The southward extension of Boundary Bay is officially named and often recalled as the Semiahmoo Bay.

Blaine had a small airport, which was mostly used by light aircraft owners for its low fuel prices and also because it had less fog than other nearby airports. The runway measured 2539 × 40 feet (774 × 12 m). The Blaine city government operated automated fuel pumps. In the spring of 2006 the city government removed several tall trees south of the runway as a precaution for safety.

Then in 2007, the City Council voted to close the airport before the end of 2008. The airport was officially closed on December 31, 2008. The area upon which the airport rests is right next to a shopping center and light industrial park. The area is now zoned for mixed use development, including light industrial manufacturing and commercial.

Climate:

Blaine is located between the mountains east of Vancouver, the flatlands of Skagit County, Washington, the North Cascades (including Mount Baker), and the south end of Vancouver Island.

The coastal climate of the region provides fairly mild weather from the rest of the Pacific Northwest. With annual precipitation of about 1000 mm (40 inches) and its milder location, Blaine enjoys more sunny days and a milder climate than neighboring communities.

Activities to do in Blaine, Washington:

Blaine, Washington

Blaine has plenty of recreational activities for the whole family. Visitors can enjoy scenic hiking trails, watching birds of the region, bicycling, visiting the public pier and fish, or kayaking in the ocean. If nature isn't your thing, Blaine offers year-round world-class golfing.

Outer Island Expeditions

Outer Island Expeditions provides everything visitors could ever want when it comes to the ocean! Leave home and immerse yourself in whale watching, fishing charters, kayaking, lighthouse tours and island tours.

Miniature World Family Fun Center

Miniature World Family Fun Center is a fun place for adults and children. They have an 18-hole miniature golf course, go-karts, and a miniature train ride through 10 acres of forest.

Family Interactive Gallery at Whatcom Museum

The museum includes three buildings, Family Interactive Gallery at Whatcom Museum with interactive art galleries, historical exhibits and photo archives.

Birch Bay Waterslides

Birch Bay Waterslides is fun for the entire family. Stay cool during the summer riding the slides and wading in the pools.

Cuisine:

Blaine, Washington

Blaine has many different types of cuisine. Being close to the ocean and with ample fishing vessels, seafood is a must, though tastes for varying palates can be found. From Thai, steakhouses, diners, American, and fast food, Blaine has something for everyone.

Restaurants to try:

  • Black Forest Steakhouse
  • Drayton Harbor Oyster Company
  • Tony's Just A Bite
  • Great Blue Heron Grill
  • Paso del Norte
  • Bob's Burgers and Brew

Cafes to try:

  • Peace City Arch Cafe
  • Mug Shots Coffee
  • Katz!
  • The C Shop
  • Espresso Avellino