The Washington Independent
The Washington Independent

Despite Spin, Support for DISCLOSE Act Is Still Strong

Last updated: July 31, 2020 | September 16, 2010 | Stefano Mclaughlin
news

The Center for Competitive Politics is touting a new poll conducted at their request by Pulse Opinion Research, claiming that it refutes previous public opinion surveys indicating widespread public support for the donor disclosure requirements contained within the DISCLOSE Act. Only problem is that it doesn’t.

“Congress should scrap the DISCLOSE Act,” Bradley Smith, chairman of the CCP, said in a statement released by the group. “Despite wild claims of popular support for the bill, it is clear that the public does not support the special treatment for unions and intrusive disclosure regime contained in the bill.”

As evidence, the group cites responses to broad questions that do not reflect directly on the language or the requirements of the DISCLOSE Act itself:

  • My family, neighbors, friends, co-workers, and strangers have a right to know what organizations I contribute to.

13% Strongly agree 11% Somewhat Agree 18% Somewhat Disagree 51% Strongly Disagree 7% Not sure 3. Citizens who contribute to advocacy groups that run political ads should have their name, home address, employer, and occupation reported to the government and posted online.

16% Strongly agree 12% Somewhat Agree 20% Somewhat Disagree 42% Strongly Disagree 9% Not sure

So far we’ve learned that most people don’t want their personal information posted online if they contribute to an organization or advocacy group that runs political ads. Luckily, the Senate DISCLOSE Act doesn’t mandate this. Instead, it states that contributions equal to or exceeding $1000 “provided for the purpose of being used for campaign-related activity or in response to a solicitation for funds to be used for campaign-related activity” must be disclosed. When you start asking people about different dollars amounts, it turns out a majority of citizens, even in CCP’s poll, are fine with this:

  • For interest groups that run political advertisements, information about members and contributors including their name, home address, employer, and occupation should be reported to the government and posted on line for anyone who gives, any amount of money,$200 or more, $600 or more, $1,000 or more, or more than $10,000.

21% Information about an interest group running political advertising members and contributors should be reported and posted for any contribution 13% For contributions over $200 10% Over $600 23% Over $1000 20% More than $10,000 13% None of this information should be reported to the government or posted online

As question 9 makes clear, 67 percent of respondents thought that donations over $1,000 should be reported and posted for disclosure purposes. In its defense, CCP points out that only 34 percent think a threshold of $200 — the current standard for reporting donations to PACs and candidates — is proper. But, again, that’s not at all what the DISCLOSE Act is proposing.

On another aspect of the DISCLOSE ACT — the “Stand by your Ad” component — CCP doesn’t even try to skew the positive support it garners:

  • By law, interest groups that sponsor political advertising must include the name of their group in the advertisement, in addition to filing public reports with further information on the group and the ad. There is discussion to also require the leader and the largest donor to the organization both personally appear in the ad, identify themselves, and state that they approve the ad. Would this additional information allow you to better judge the credibility and accuracy of the ad?

68% This would be of some or great value in better understanding and judging the ad’s accuracy and credibility 22% This would be of little or no value in better understanding and judging the ad’s accuracy and credibility 10% Not sure

Stefano Mclaughlin | For the first five years of his career, Stefano worked as a financial advisor on state and local tax matters, developing internal marketing technology for his multinational tax business. With over 12 years of experience designing high-performance web applications and interactive interactions, Stefano is now a marketing technology specialist and founder.

Related

$1.3 trillion in federal spending unaccounted for, report finds

Despite calls for independent bodies to keep government accountable, the Sunlight Foundation’s most recent Clearspending report has found the federal

$1.89 billion given to states to fight HIV

The federal government Monday announced more than $1.89 billion in funding to states to fight the HIV epidemic with access to care and with more cash for the failing AIDS Drug Assistance Program. According to an HHS press release , $813 million of that money will go directly to the ADAP programming. An additional $8,386,340 will be issued as a supplement to 36 states and territories currently facing a litany of unmet needs and access issues.

$1.3 Million for Brown

The GOP’s candidate in the Massachusetts special election raised more than one million dollars -- double the goal -- in a 24-hour moneybomb on the Ron Paul

1. Brian Schweitzer

As governor of Montana, Schweitzer doesn’t represent one of the most highly populated, high-profile electoral states in the country. But this

#1 in Conspiracy Theories

Andrew Young’s tell-all biography of John Edwards, hitting shelves next week, is surging in one Amazon.com category in particular. #1 in Conspiracy

1 Brigade and 1 Battalion

ISTANBUL – It’s 10 p.m. in the lowest level of the Istanbul airport. In 20 minutes I’ll be allowed to board my plane to Kabul, bringing me to the

1. Lindsey Graham

Sen. Graham (R-S.C.) is typically regarded as a reliable vote for his party, but he took the bold step of breaking with his fellow Republicans to join Kerry

$1 Million for Toomey

Pat Toomey, the former Club for Growth president and leading Republican candidate in Pennsylvania’s 2010 Senate race, has announced a $1 million haul in the

$1 Trillion for Fannie and Freddie?

That is the worst-case scenario, according to Egan-Jones Ratings Co., quoted in a Bloomberg article making the rounds. The agency says that if home prices

Bachmann uncomfortable over earmarks ban

Republicans appear to have boxed themselves into a corner with their portrayal of earmarks as wasteful spending, as many of them have backed a moratorium on

Troubled mine holds hope for U.S. rare earth industry

China currently controls 97 percent of the world’s rare earth production. The Mountain Pass Mine could change that -- if it can overcome serious environmental concerns.

© Copyright 2021 The Washington Independent All Rights Reserved

Terms & Privacy | twi.news@washingtonindependent.com