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Gitmo Habeas Scoreboard — Detainee WinsReleasedStill in Custody

Detainees U.S. Government 32 9 Below is a list of the Guantanamo habeas corpus cases in which the detainee won. Information compiled by Pro

Anita Barnes
News
Last updated: Jul 31, 2020 | Dec 16, 2009

Table of Contents

Detainees U.S. Government
32 9

*Below is a list of the Guantanamo *habeas corpus cases in which the detainee won. Information compiled by Pro Publica and David Remes, legal director of Appeal for Justice.

See the 21 detainees who have been released.

See the 11 detainees who are still in custody.

Released

Abdul Ghappar Abdul Rahman Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Rahman released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge’s release order was blocked by D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Status Report
  • Court Transcript

Dawut Abdurehim Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Abdurehim released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations
  • Status Report
  • Court Transcript

Abdulrahim Abdul Razak Al Janko Syrian

Captured by U.S. forces in January 2002 in Kandahar, Afghanistan.

The government alleged that, in early 2000, Janko spent five days at a Taliban guesthouse and trained for 18 days at a Qaeda military camp.

Judge found Janko eligible for release June 22, 2009. He has since been transferred to a foreign nation, but the government will not specify which nation or reveal the date of transfer.

Judge found Janko eligible for release June 22, 2009, but the government continues to hold him at Guantanamo. Janko was eligible for release, the judge said, because by the time of his arrest in 2002 he should not have been considered to be part of the Taliban or al-Qaeda. The evidence showed that he’d been tortured by al-Qaeda and imprisoned for 18 months by the Taliban in an infamously “horrific” prison.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Khalid Abdullah Mishal Al Mutairi Kuwaiti

Captured near Pakistan-Afghanistan border in November 2001

The government alleged that Al Mutairi was a part of al-Qaeda or of a force associated with al-Qaeda, because, among other claims, he’d attended a training camp believed to be affiliated with al-Qaeda.

On July 29, 2009, judge ordered the government to “take all necessary and appropriate steps to facilitate Al Mutairi’s release forthwith.” He was transferred to Kuwait on Oct. 13, 2009.

The judge concluded that “there is nothing in the record beyond speculation” to prove the government’s allegations. Intelligence reports were too impreciseand needed corroborating proof, she said. For instance, “one reference, in a portion of one sentence, in one interrogation report,” was not enough to prove Al Mutairi had attended a terrorist training camp, because the report didn’t clearly identify him. She rejected one self-incriminating statement from an interrogation of Al Mutairi because “he appears to have been goaded into making these statements.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations

Alla Bin Ali Ahmed Yemeni

Captured March 2002 at a guesthouse for Yemenis in Faisalabad, Pakistan.

The government alleged that Ali Ahmed had traveled and stayed with al-Qaeda and/or Taliban members in Afghanistan, and that he’d fought and trained in Afghanistan.

Judge found Ali Ahmed eligible for release May 11, 2009. He was transferred to Yemen on September 26, 2009.

Judge concluded that the government had failed to present reliable evidence proving its allegations, and that certain alleged conduct — such as traveling in the company of terrorists and staying at a suspect guesthouse — wouldn’t be enough to detain Ali Ahmed even if proved.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Court Transcript

Fouad Mahmoud Al Rabiah Kuwaiti

Captured near the Afghanistan/Pakistan border in Dec. 2001.

The government alleged that Rabiah “provided material support to the Taliban and al Qaida,” meeting with bin Laden four times in July 2001 and delivering money to him.

Judge ordered release Sept. 17, 2009. Rabiah was transferred to Kuwait on Dec. 9, 2009.

Judge ordered release Sept. 17, 2009. The judge found that the evidence against Rabiah consisted “almost exclusively on Rabiah’s ‘confessions,’” which even Rabiah’s interrogators concluded were “not believable.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Hadj Boudella Algerian

Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of U.S. military.

The government mainly alleged that he’d planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces.Also that he associated with al-Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he’d worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.

Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Boudella was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.

Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. “[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source,” wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence “is not sufficient” to prove the legality of detention, he said.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Detainee response

Lakhdar Boumediene Algerian

Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of US military.

The government mainly alleged that he’d planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces.Also that he associated with al-Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he’d worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.

Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Boumediene was transferred to France May 15, 2009.

Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. “[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source,” wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence “is not sufficient” to prove the legality of detention, he said.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Detainee response

Mohammed El Gharani Born in Saudi Arabia, citizen of Chad

Arrested by Pakistani authorities and turned over to the United States in early 2002.

The government alleged that he’d stayed at a Qaeda-affiliated guesthouse in Afghanistan, received military training at a Qaeda camp, served as a courier for al-Qaeda members, fought the U.S. and allies at the battle of Tora Bora, and belonged to a Qaeda cell based in London.

Judge found El Gharani eligible for release Jan. 13, 2009. He was transferred to Chad on June 11, 2009.

The government’s evidence was unreliable, the judge said, because it consisted chiefly of statements by two other detainees — sometimes contradicting each other — whose believability was questioned by the government itself.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Anwar Hassan Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release June 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Hassan released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Status Report
  • Government allegations
  • Court Transcript

Mustafa Ait Idir Algerian

Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of US military.

The government mainly alleged that he’d planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces.Also that he associated with al-Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he’d worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.

Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Ait Idir was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.

Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. “[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source,” wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence “is not sufficient” to prove the legality of detention, he said.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Jalal Jalaldin (aka Abdullah Abdulqadir) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Parhat released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge’s release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Jalaldin nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations

Mohammed Jawad Afghan

Arrested by local officials in Afghanistan in December 2002.

The government alleged that on Dec. 17, 2002, Jawad tossed a grenade in Afghanistan that seriously injured two U.S. soldiers and their local interpreter.

On July 30, 2009, judge ordered that “beginning on August 21″ the government “shall promptly release petitioner Jawad.” He was transferred to Afghanistan on Aug. 24, 2009.

Technically the judge ordered Jawad released because the government said it would no longer detain him as a wartime enemy. But the government’s decision followed a scathing reprimand from the judge for continuing to detain Jawad and prosecute him in a military commission based mostly on a confession obtained by Afghan officials under death threats.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Court Transcript

Saber Lahmar Algerian

Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of US military.

The government mainly alleged that he’d planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces.Also that he associated with al-Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he’d worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.

Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Lahmar was transferred to France on Nov. 30, 2009.

Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. “[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source,” wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence “is not sufficient” to prove the legality of detention, he said.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations

Edham Mamet Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Mamet released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations
  • Status Report
  • Court Transcript

Abdul Nasser (aka Khaleel Mamut) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer November 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Nassar released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Nasser nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda on June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations

Mohamed Nechla Algerian

Arrested by Bosnian authorities in October 2001 on suspicion of plotting to bomb the U.S. embassy in Sarajevo. Cleared for release January 2002, but transported to Guantanamo at request of US military.

The government mainly alleged that he’d planned to travel to Afghanistan in late 2001 to fight the U.S. and allied forces.Also that he associated with al-Qaeda and other suspected terrorists and that he’d worked for a Qaeda-affiliated organization that provided material support to terrorists.

Judge ordered release Nov. 20, 2008. Nechla was transferred to Bosnia and Herzegovina Dec. 16, 2008.

Judge decided the government failed to prove its allegations by a preponderance (majority) of the evidence. “[T]he Government relies exclusively on the information contained in a classified document from an unnamed source,” wrote the judge. This single piece of evidence “is not sufficient” to prove the legality of detention, he said.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations
  • Detainee Response

Adel Noori Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer October 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Noori released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S. — and that Parhat could not be held as an enemy combatant on “bare assertions.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Huzaifa Parhat Chinese (Uighur)

Captured December 2001 in Pakistan by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, then transferred to U.S. military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Parhat released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge’s release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Parhat nevertheless was transferred to Bermuda, June 11, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S. – and that Parhat could not be held as an enemy combatant on “bare assertions.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Abdul Semet (aka Salahadin Abdulahat) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Rahman released Oct. 8, 2008. The government appealed, and judge’s release order was blocked by D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Ahmad Tourson Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Tourson released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. He was transferred to Palau on Oct. 31, 2009. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations

Still in Custody

Mohammed Al Adahi Yemeni

Captured by Pakistani authorities near the Afghanistan border in December 2001.

The government alleged that Adahi once helped tend to wounded Taliban soldiers during a bus trip; was present in Kabul during the U.S. air campaign there; and was in possession of the model of a watch that has been used in bombings linked to al-Qaeda.

Judge ordered release Aug. 17, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo.

Judge ordered release Aug. 17, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo. The judge found “no reliable evidence” that Adahi supported, trained or fought for, or was a member of al-Qaeda, and that while Adahi acknowledged meeting Osama Bin Laden, that did not justify his detention.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government Allegations
  • Detainee response

Khalid Ali (aka Saidullah Khalik) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Ali released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Ali has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S. — and that Khalid could not be held as an enemy combatant on “bare assertions.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Status Report

Yasin Muhammed Basardh Yemeni

Captured near the Afghanistan/Pakistan border in early 2002.

The government alleged that Basardh trained at a Qaeda military camp and fought for the Taliban, hiding with Osama bin Laden in the mountains of Tora Bora in late 2001.

Judge found Basardh eligible for release April 15, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo, while the government appeals the decision.

Judge found Basardh eligible for release. However, he remains at Guantanamo, while the government appeals the decision. The judge said the admitted Taliban fighter could no longer be properly detained, because news reports showed that Basardh gave U.S. authorities information about numerous other suspected terrorists. “[A]ny ties with the enemy have been severed, and any realistic risk that he could rejoin the enemy has been foreclosed,” the judge wrote.

  • Trial Court Decision

Farhi Saeed bin Mohammed Algerian

Captured by Pakistani authorities in late 2001 while attempting to cross the border from Afghanistan to Pakistan.

The government alleged that Mohammed received weapons training in Afghanistan, and that he saw Osama bin Laden at a funeral in Kabul shortly after 9/11.

Judge ordered release Nov. 19, 2009. Mohammed remains at Guantanamo.

The court has not yet released a declassified version of the judge’s opinion.

Saeed Hatim Yemeni

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

He went to Afghanistan in 2001, where he attended the al-Farouq training camp and joined Arab soldiers near Kabul.

A judge granted his petition for a writ of habeas corpus on Dec. 16, 2009. He remains at Guantanamo.

Arkin Mahmud Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in Afghanistan in November 2001

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer January 2006. Federal trial judge ordered Mahmud released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Mahmud has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs? appeal of their case.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status report (September 2008)
  • Court transcript

Bahtiyar Mahnut Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Mahnut released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Mahnut has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status report (September 2008)
  • Court transcript

Hammad Memet (aka Ahmed Mohamed) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer May 2008. Federal trial judge ordered Memet released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Memet has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status report (September 2008)
  • Court transcript

Sabir Osman (aka Hajiakbar Abdulghupur) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for release August 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Osman released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Osman has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status report (September 2008)
  • Court transcript)

Abdul Razakah Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer December 2005. Federal trial judge ordered Razakah released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Razakah has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs’ appeal of their case.

The D.C. federal appeals court decided on June 20, 2008, that the government had failed to present enough reliable evidence to prove key allegations — that ETIM was linked to al-Qaeda and the Taliban, and that ETIM was hostile to the U.S.”

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status Report
  • Court Transcript

Abdul Sabour (aka Yusef Abbas) Chinese (Uighur)

Captured in December 2001 by Pakistani civilians, handed over to Pakistani authorities, transferred to US military for $5,000.

The government alleged that he was affiliated with a Uighur (Chinese ethnic minority) independence group know as the East Turkistan Islamic Movement, from which he received weapons training. ETIM was alleged to be associated with al-Qaeda and the Taliban and engaged in hostilities against the U.S. and allies.

Ordered released, remains at Gitmo.

Determined by government to be eligible for transfer November 2003. Federal trial judge ordered Sabour released Oct. 8, 2008, but the government appealed, and the release order was blocked by the D.C. federal appeals court. Sabour has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to reverse the appeals court’s decision. He remains at Guantanamo. In October, the Supreme Court agreed to hear the Uighurs? appeal of their case.

  • Trial Court Decision
  • Government allegations
  • Status Report
  • Court Transcript
Anita Barnes | With over twenty years of professional experience in the design industry, I'm a web designer and front-end web developer. As a small business owner, I am familiar with the difficulties that come with running a business. One of those challenges is creating a strong online presence. One that not only represents your ever-changing brand and personality, but also appeals to your target audience. Throughout my web design career, I've built a distinct design style that emphasizes attention to detail. I assume that less is enough when it comes to design. You don't have to have all the bells and whistles only because you can. It's critical to figure out which elements are essential for getting your message through to your customers – and which ones are unnecessary. I'll assist you in sorting through the choices to see what works best for you.

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EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson (Pic by USACEpublicaffairs, via Flickr) EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson penned a new op-ed for the Los Angeles Times , criticizing House Republicans desperately seeking to undermine the authority of the agency they have dubbed a “job killer.” Arguing that the environment affects red states and blue states alike, Jackson writes that “it is time for House Republicans to stop politicizing our air and water.” As head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Jackson has faced harsh criticism from House Republicans and GOP presidential candidates who say the agency’s regulations are an undue burden on businesses that have to cut jobs simply to comply with clean water and air rules. Presidential hopeful Michele Bachmann  has pledged to end the EPA if she takes office. “Since the beginning of this year, Republicans in the House have averaged roughly a vote every day the chamber has been in session to undermine the Environmental Protection Agency and our nation’s environmental laws,” writes Jackson.

EPA and California Near Deal on Fuel Efficiency Standards

Two weeks ago, the Obama administration raised fuel efficiency standards by an average of two miles per gallon -- a modest change that disappointed some

EPA announces hold on nutrient standards if Florida can come up with own criteria

The EPA announced today that it is now prepared to withdraw a portion of its proposed numeric nutrient criteria (a set of standards governing water pollution in inland waters) and delay the portion related to estuarine waters, to allow the state Department of Environmental Protection to develop its own criteria. # From a statement released by the EPA earlier today: # EPA recognizes that states have the primary role in establishing and implementing water quality standards for their waters. Therefore, EPA is prepared to withdraw the federal inland standards and delay the estuarine standards if FDEP adopts, and EPA approves, their own protective and scientifically sound numeric standards

EPA biologist says fracking may be partly to blame for West Virginia fish kill

New documents obtained by an environmental news service show that an EPA analyst believes that wastewater from fracking may be partly responsible for a fish kill in a West Virginia river. Scientific American reports : U.S

EPA Chief Overruled Calif. Waiver, Too

The Washington Post reported in March that EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson was overruled by the White House in setting an ozone standard. Now, documents

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