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'Winnie The Pooh' Horror Film Cancelled In Hong Kong

The ''winnie the pooh' cancelled in hong kong. Yes, the screening of the British horror film "Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey," which was scheduled to be released in Hong Kong this week, has been canceled because theaters in the city have denied to show it, according to the announcement made by the film's distributor on Tuesday.

Tyrese Griffin
Mar 23, 2023101 Shares1627 Views
The 'Winnie the Pooh' canceled in Hong Kong. Yes, the screening of the British horror film "Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey," which was scheduled to be released in Hong Kong this week, has been canceled because theaters in the city have denied to show it, according to the announcement made by the film's distributor on Tuesday.
The movie was supposed to open on March 23 at all 32 theaters in the city, but it was canceled for unknown reasons, according to VII Pillars Entertainment, which said it was unaware of the reason. VII Pillars spokesperson Ray Fong said:
We are pulling our hair of course, very disappointed. It's just unbelievable that cinemas cancel the exhibition after all arrangements were made.- Ray Fong

Censorship Of Winnie The Pooh In China And Cancellation Of Film Screening In Hong Kong

The primary character in the film, which was developed by the English author A.A. Milne, has already been the target of censorship in China due to memes that connect the bumbling bear to President Xi Jinping.
When Chinese President Xi Jinping visited the United States in 2013 and met with Barack Obama, who was serving as his counterpart at the time, several internet critics jumped on their resemblance to Winnie the Pooh and Tigger and began drawing analogies between the two.
The character Winnie the Pooh from the forest horror film
The character Winnie the Pooh from the forest horror film
Some individuals have used a picture of Pooh as a symbol of their disagreement.
Reuters was informed by the Office for Film, Newspaper and Article Administration (OFNAA) that it had presented the applicant with a certificate indicating that they had been granted approval.
A spokesperson for the OFNAA stated that the organization would not comment on such arrangements. "The arrangements of cinemas in Hong Kong on the screening of individual films with certificates of approval in their premises are the commercial decisions of the cinemas concerned, and OFNAA would not comment on such arrangements,
The theaters in question did not provide any remark in response to our inquiries.
According to VII Pillars, the movie was produced on a very limited budget and "sold to nearly 200 territories in just 6 months. An astounding achievement within such a short period".
Moviematic, the company that had scheduled a showing of the movie for Tuesday evening, announced the screening's cancellation on its social media website, citing technical reasons for the decision.
According to the director Rhys Frake-Waterfield, who spoke with Reuters, "something weird" had taken place. Frake-Waterfield said:
The cinemas agreed to show it, then all independently come to the same decision overnight. It won't be a coincidence.- Frake-Waterfield
"They claim technical reasons, but there is no technical reason," he said. "The film has been shown on over 4,000 cinema screens worldwide. These 30+ screens in Hong Kong are the only ones with such issues."

Winnie the Pooh: Blood and Honey Trailer #1 (2023)

As anti-government and pro-democracy rallies rocked Hong Kong in 2019, Beijing imposed a national security law on the city in 2020 to crack down on dissent. This came after the city was rocked by protests the previous year.
Films that "endorse, support, glorify, encourage and incite activities that might endanger national security" are prohibited under a new censorship rule that went into effect in 2021 in the territory that had previously been a British colony.
The year before, the Hong Kong International Film Festival did not screen two films because they were unable to secure authorization from the relevant authorities.
This decision was made when Hong Kong is playing host to the annual Art Basel contemporary art fair, which the local government is using as an opportunity to portray the city as a thriving cultural center.
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