Latest In

News

Strawberry-like Sea Creature With 20 Arms Found In Antarctic Ocean

Strawberry-like sea creature with 20 arms found in Antarctic Ocean in a remarkable and unexpected revelation as a collaborative team of scientists hailing from Australia and the United States underwent a series of intensive research expeditions conducted near the Antarctic region.

Daisy-Mae Schmitt
Aug 13, 202332 Shares31780 Views
Strawberry-like sea creature with 20 arms found in Antarctic Oceanin a remarkable and unexpected revelation as a collaborative team of scientists hailing from Australia and the United States underwent a series of intensive research expeditions conducted near the Antarctic region.
This newfound species has been playfully named the "Antarctic strawberry feather" due to its uncanny resemblance to the shape of a strawberry. Sporting approximately 20 arms, the creature's coloration exhibits a spectrum spanning from "purplish" to "dark reddish."
The team's groundbreaking findings have been documented in the esteemed journal Invertebrate Systematics. Over a span of expeditions extending from 2008 to 2017, the researchers undertook multiple journeys into the depths of the Antarctic Ocean.
Their primary objective was to uncover a hidden assemblage of enigmatic marine creatures recognized as Promachocrinus species or, colloquially, Antarctic feather stars. These organisms were distinguished by their mesmerizing and otherworldly movements, adding an extra layer of intrigue to their discovery.
In an unexpected revelation, a group of scientists hailing from Australia and the United States have uncovered a "surprisingly eerie" underwater species following a series of research expeditions conducted near Antarctica. As detailed in a report by CTV News, this newfound creature has been playfully designated the "Antarctic strawberry feather" due to its striking resemblance to the contours of a strawberry. With around 20 arms adorning its form, the creature's color palette can transition from shades of "purplish" to "dark reddish."
The outcomes of this remarkable discovery have been documented in the esteemed journal Invertebrate Systematics. Over a span of excursions spanning from 2008 to 2017, the team embarked on numerous voyages into the depths of the Antarctic Ocean.
The Antarctic Ocean with a big iceberg
The Antarctic Ocean with a big iceberg
Their primary aim was to unveil an elusive assembly of concealed marine organisms recognized as Promachocrinus species or, informally, Antarctic feather stars. These creatures were characterized by their captivating and almost otherworldly movements, further heightening the intrigue surrounding their revelation.
The research team collected samples from various locations worldwide, including the Siple Coast, Diego Ramirez, and Prince Edward Island, as detailed in the study. "In total, the researchers successfully identified seven novel species falling under the classification of Promachocrinus, effectively expanding the count of recognized Antarctic feather species from one to a grand total of eight," they reported.
The newly discovered species has been christened 'Promachocrinus fragarius' in scientific nomenclature. The study expounds that the term "Fragarius" is derived from the Latin word "fragum," signifying "strawberry."
The scientists further elaborated that these creatures are of substantial proportions and can inhabit depths ranging from approximately 65 to 1,170 meters beneath the water's surface. Upon initial observation, the Antarctic strawberry feather star presents an appearance akin to that of an extraterrestrial entity. Yet, upon closer inspection of photographs capturing the aquatic creature, its strawberry-esque structure and texture come into sharper focus.

Conclusion

The researchers pointed out that identifying undiscovered species, also known as "dark taxa," from Antarctica can be a lengthier process compared to typical cases due to limitations regarding the extent of required sampling. The scientists elaborated, "Understanding which taxa are truly cryptic and only recognisable with molecular data, and those that are pseudocryptic and can be identified once characters have been revised in a molecular framework is important. Monitoring biodiversity requires robust identification of taxa and this can be very complicated when taxa are truly cryptic."
Jump to
Latest Articles
Popular Articles