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Southern Turkey Hit By 6.3 Magnitude Aftershock, Killing 6 And Injuring Hundreds

Southern Turkey hit by 6.3 magnitude aftershock on Monday, killing at least six people and injuring hundreds more as the area continues to recover from the terrible earthquake that hit on February 6.

Henry Hamer
Feb 22, 2023826 Shares45865 Views
Southern Turkey hit by 6.3 magnitude aftershockon Monday, killing at least six people and injuring hundreds more as the area continues to recover from the terrible earthquake that hit on February 6.
On Monday, a magnitude 6.3 aftershock hit southern Turkey, in the region of Hatay, not far from the Syrian border. According to the Turkish Emergency Coordination Center SAKOM, the quake's epicenter was located in the Defne neighborhood.
Aftershocks become less frequent with time, although they can continue for days, weeks, months, or even years for a very large mainshock- USGS
Afterwards, there were another ninety aftershocks, the greatest of which measured 5.8 on the Richter scale.
SAKOM said Tuesday that 294 individuals were hurt, 18 "seriously," and that survivors were sent to nearby hospitals for care.
The director of Turkey's Disaster and Emergency Management Agency (AFAD), Yunus Sezer, tweeted on Tuesday that search and rescue activities were underway in the impacted districts.

The Earthquake And Its Aftermath

The earthquake struck at around 4:30 pm local time on Sunday, with its epicenter located near the town of Sivrice in Elazig province. The quake was felt in several nearby provinces, including Diyarbakir and Bingol.
The initial quake caused significant damage to buildings and infrastructure, with many homes and businesses being destroyed or badly damaged.
As of now, there have been no official reports of casualties, but local authorities are still assessing the extent of the damage and the number of people affected.
Aftershocks were felt in the hours following the initial quake, with some being strong enough to be felt in Istanbul, located over 800 km away.

Turkey's Response To The Earthquake

The Turkish government has mobilized resources to assist those affected by the earthquake.
Emergency services, including search and rescue teams, have been deployed to the affected areas, and the Turkish Red Crescent has set up tents and emergency shelters for those who have lost their homes.
The government has also released funds to assist with the recovery efforts and has urged citizens to donate to relief efforts.

Turkey's Vulnerability To Earthquakes

Turkey is located in a seismically active region, and earthquakes are a common occurrence in the country.
Because of its location on two different tectonic plates, Turkey often experiences powerful earthquakes. During the previous 25 years, seven earthquakes of magnitude 7.0 or higher have hit the nation, but the one on February 6 was the strongest and deadliest.
The earthquake on Monday is being classified as an aftershock since it occurred in the same location as the 7.8 magnitude earthquake but had a lesser magnitude.
The last major earthquake to hit Turkey was in 1999, when a 7.4 magnitude quake struck the city of Izmit, killing over 17,000 people.
Since then, the government has taken steps to improve building standards and disaster preparedness, but many buildings in older parts of the country are still vulnerable to earthquakes.

Final Words

The earthquake that struck Turkey on Sunday is a stark reminder of the country's vulnerability to seismic activity. While there have been no official reports of casualties, the damage to buildings and infrastructure in the affected areas is significant.
The Turkish government has mobilized resources to assist those affected, and it is hoped that the recovery efforts will be successful in providing relief to those who have lost their homes and livelihoods.
It is also a reminder of the importance of disaster preparedness and building standards in seismically active regions.
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