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Russia Is Jailing And Beating Up Own Soldiers Who Refuse To Fight In Ukraine

Russia is jailing and beating up own soldiers who refuse to fight and even subjecting them to physical harm. In February of this year, Russia invaded Ukraine. Following sustained gains in the early months of the war, Russian troops were forced to retreat in the face of a Ukrainian counteroffensive.

Rhyley Carney
Dec 12, 20222857 Shares49266 Views
Russia is jailing and beating up own soldierswho refuse to fight and even subjecting them to physical harm. In February of this year, Russia invaded Ukraine. Following sustained gains in the early months of the war, Russian troops were forced to retreat in the face of a Ukrainian counteroffensive.
Reports of Russian soldiers sabotaging their military vehicles to avoid fighting circulated even before the Russian retreat, implying a possible lack of morale in the Russian ranks. Soldiers are reportedly being told to march on with little information about their goals.

The Russians Were Locked Up For Refusing To Fight

Russian soldiers 'beat up' for refusing to fight in Ukraine war - BBC News

Many of the newly mobilized troops were quick to complain about being sent to a war zone without adequate equipment or training.
There have been numerous reports from Ukraine of mobilized Russian troops being detained, in some cases locked in cellars and basements, for refusing to return to the frontlines. Refusing to return to the front lines may be a moral stand for some Russians.
However, there is a more common explanation. Reports of disillusioned soldiers and detention centers are dismissed by Russian authorities as fake news.
We do not have any camps or incarceration facilities, or the like [for Russian soldiers]. This is all nonsense and fake claims and there is nothing to back them up with.- President Putin
"We have no issues with soldiers leaving combat positions," the Kremlin leader added. "When there is shelling or bombs falling, normal people cannot help but react, even on a physiological level." But, after a period of adjustment, our men fight brilliantly."
Andrei, a Russian lieutenant, came to a halt. Andrei, who was deployed to Ukraine in July, was detained for refusing to carry out orders.
He was able to contact his mother, Oxana, in Russia and inform her of the situation. We've changed their names yet again.
"He said he refused to lead his men to certain death," Oxana says. "As an officer, he knew they wouldn't make it out alive if they went ahead." They detained my son as a result of this. Then I received a text message informing me that he and four other officers had been placed in a basement.
They have not been seen in five months. I later learned that the building they were in had been shelled and that all five men had gone missing.
They stated that no remains had been discovered. Their official status is currently unavailable. It makes no sense. It's ridiculous. My son's treatment was not only illegal but also inhuman."
"People here don't realize how dangerous we are. Not from the other side. But from our perspective."

Over 100 Russian Soldiers Reportedly Jailed

War-weary Russian soldiers have been imprisoned by their commanders after refusing to fight in Ukraine due to the invasion's "complete disregard for human life."
An estimated 140 soldiers have been imprisoned in Ukraine, with some allegedly being guarded by pro-Moscow mercenaries in a military base surrounded by land mines. At least four of them now want their superiors punished for the illegal arrests.
Vladimir Putin's forces invaded Ukraine in February but never formally declared war, which means soldiers can be fired but not imprisoned, according to an attorney who has represented reluctant soldiers. Hundreds of people were released after refusing to take part in the invasion.
There have been reports of low soldier morale and chaos among the commanding ranks as Russia has faced a surprisingly effective resistance from Ukraine. According to the soldier's testimony, superiors urged war-weary soldiers to return to the fight.
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