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Meteosat - European Ariane 5 Rocket Takes Off Into Space

A new generation of European weather satellites, Meteosat, launched on Tuesday, with the goal of providing 50 times more data than is currently possible to help meteorologists improve the accuracy of their forecasts.

Kenzo Norman
Dec 14, 20222298 Shares85107 Views
A new generation of European weather satellites, Meteosat, launched on Tuesday, with the goal of providing 50 times more data than is currently possible to help meteorologists improve the accuracy of their forecasts. This will be especially helpful in predicting the path and severity of impending storms.
Three satellites in geostationary orbit, 36,000 kilometers above the equator over Africa, will make up the €4.3bn Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) system. Images of Europe will be sent every two and a half minutes, and they will provide the first thorough observations of lightning from space.
The new satellites will deliver 50 times more data than the present Meteosat Second Generation, which will continue to operate for many more years after the new ones are completely deployed in 2026.
Getting it into its final location 36,000 kilometers above the equator will take some time, and it will be another year before its data are completely incorporated into forecasting models. The advantages, however, should be readily apparent when this is accomplished.
The purpose is to provide meteorological services with a vastly increased amount of more precise information which will help them protect lives, property and infrastructure.- Phil Evans, Eumetsat

Meteosat Returns A Full Picture Of The Weather

Since 1977, Europe has had its own own meteorological satellite orbiting Earth. This latest imager is the third in a series.
Every 10 minutes, instead of the current 15 minutes, Meteosat-12 will send back a complete image of the weather underneath it. Even smaller atmospheric objects (500 m in size or less) will be seen for the first time, and it will be able to observe them in a wider spectrum of light.
The quantity of information available to national prediction organizations like the Met Office in the United Kingdom and Meteo France in France will increase dramatically.
There is a camera installed just for seeing lightning, which is a significant improvement. The agencies anticipate this would improve "nowcasting," the process of monitoring and issuing warnings about potentially dangerous occurrences that are in the immediate future. Reason being that lightning acts as a beacon for severe weather such as high winds, downpours, and hail.
Although lightning may be followed by monitoring its radio emissions, this only accounts for 10% of all lightning, which occurs from cloud to ground.
The new Meteosat instrument is set to be a game-changer. It will give us a much better handle on total lightning. That's something we need to know if we're forecasting for helicopter operations in the North Sea, for example. Likewise, if there are hazardous materials being unloaded from aircraft, even passengers, we need to know if there is a lightning risk.- Simon Keogh, UK Met Office
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Inclusion Of A Camera To Detect Lightning

There is a camera installed just for seeing lightning, which is a significant improvement. The agencies anticipate this would improve "nowcasting," the process of monitoring and issuing warnings about potentially dangerous occurrences that are in the immediate future. Reason being that lightning acts as a beacon for severe weather such as high winds, downpours, and hail.
Although lightning may be followed by monitoring its radio emissions, this only accounts for 10% of all lightning, which occurs from cloud to ground. After some time, the next generation system will have three spacecraft operating together.
A second imager is scheduled to be launched in 2026 to take faster (every 2.5 minutes) images of Europe. To get a feel for the atmospheric conditions beforehand, a "sounding" spacecraft will be sent into orbit in 2024. Europe will have uninterrupted service until at least the 2040s thanks to the replacement satellites that have been purchased for the first three.
There is a definite additional benefit to the economy that is evaluated by repeated evaluations to be worth billions of dollars annually in ways such as boosting consumer confidence, decreasing traffic accidents, and making industries like aviation and shipping more efficient.

Final Words

After some time, the next generation system will have three spacecraft operating together. A second imager is scheduled to be launched in 2026 to take faster (every 2.5 minutes) images of Europe. To get a feel for the atmospheric conditions beforehand, a "sounding" spacecraft will be sent into orbit in 2024.
Europe will have uninterrupted service until at least the 2040s thanks to the replacement satellites that have been purchased for the first three. The cost of this skill is high. The European Space Agency (Esa) member states have contributed €1.4bn (£1.2bn) to the R&D effort. The continuing expenditures of €2.9bn (£2.5bn) are being covered by the Eumetsat states.
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