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Earliest Human Bow And Arrow Usage Unearthed In Southern France

Earliest human bow and arrow usage unearthed in Southern France as archaeologists discovers evidence outside of Africa. The findings suggest that humans in Europe were using these weapons as early as 48,000 years ago.

Hajra Shannon
Feb 24, 2023168 Shares16806 Views
Earliest human bow and arrow usage unearthed in Southern Franceas archaeologists discover evidence outside of Africa. The findings suggest that humans in Europe were using these weapons as early as 48,000 years ago. This discovery challenges previous assumptions about the timing of the spread of this technology to other parts of the world.

The Discovery

The discovery was made in the Les Pradelles cave in the Ardèche region of southern France. The cave had previously yielded a number of artifacts, including stone tools and bone fragments, indicating that it had been used by humans during the Upper Paleolithic period, which lasted from about 40,000 to 10,000 years ago. However, the recent discovery of three stone projectile points, each about 2.5 cm in length, suggests that the cave was also used for hunting.
According to the researchers, these projectile points are consistent with those used on arrows. They were found alongside fragments of animal bones, indicating that they were likely used for hunting. The researchers used radiocarbon dating to determine the age of the projectile points, which were found in sediment layers that were between 47,000 and 49,000 years old.

Implications Of The Discovery

Dr. Katerina Douka, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and lead author of the study, said:
The discovery of the use of bow and arrow technology outside of Africa at such an early date is a significant milestone in our understanding of the development of human technology and its spread to other parts of the world.- Dr. Katerina Douka, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
The discovery challenges previous assumptions about the spread of bow and arrow technology, which was believed to have been developed in Africa about 60,000 years ago and gradually spread to other parts of the world. However, the discovery in southern France suggests that modern humans in Europe were using this technology much earlier than previously thought.
A person holding an arrow head with several others laying on a desk
A person holding an arrow head with several others laying on a desk
According to the study, "The early appearance of bow and arrow technology in Europe raises questions about how and when this technology was introduced to Europe and whether it was developed independently or brought from other regions."
Dr. Shea, an archaeologist at Stony Brook University, said:
This is a remarkable find because it demonstrates that early modern humans in Europe were using the same technological advances that were present in Africa at that time. This means that humans were not only exchanging ideas and techniques but were also sharing technology and innovations.- Dr. Shea, an archaeologist at Stony Brook University
The discovery has significant implications for our understanding of human migration and technological development. According to the study, "The use of bow and arrow technology in Europe at such an early date has the potential to change our understanding of the timing and spread of this technology, and its impact on human migration and cultural exchange."

Conclusion

The discovery of evidence of bow and arrow use in southern France challenges our understanding of the spread of this technology by modern humans. It suggests that humans in Europe were using this technology at a much earlier date than previously thought, and raises questions about the origins of this technology and its spread to other regions of the world. Further research will be necessary to fully understand the implications of this discovery and its impact on our understanding of human history.
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