⭐🔥 Click here to check Latest Celeb News & Celebrity Gossip in 2022! 🔥⭐
The Washington Independent
The Washington Independent

CCP’s Response on DISCLOSE Act Polling Analysis

In response to my post earlier this afternoon on new polling numbers for the DISCLOSE Act, The Center For Competitive Politics’s Jeff Patch has supplied me with

Katya Ryder
News
Last updated: Jul 31, 2020 | Sep 17, 2010

In response to my post earlier this afternoon on new polling numbers for the DISCLOSE Act, The Center For Competitive Politics’s Jeff Patch has supplied me with the following response:

Regarding your post, I guess I take your point that the poll questions weren’t uniformly positive in terms of supporting our ideology. I thought that was evident, not something we were hiding or “spinning.”

Nonetheless, a couple points:

(1) Our observation that DISCLOSE doesn’t enjoy the support many reform groups claim is not based mainly on the disclosure questions; it’s based on question 8 (and 5 to a lesser extent) showing that 56 percent of likely voters think interest groups should be free to spend money on politics. This contrasts with the WaPo poll and others showing large majorities opposed to CU when using wording about corporations or corruption. The post doesn’t even address that issue, which is still a huge part of DISCLOSE. Despite The Hill report that Schumer is considering stripping the non-disclosure provisions, they still remain and we’ve heard of no outreach whatsoever on these issues to moderate Republicans.

(2) Our assertion isn’t that people oppose disclosure, it’s that they’re more skeptical than commonly believed. We freely acknowledge that the disclosure threshold provision question (9) is mixed, but this goes to the point that there’s not overwhelming support for the DISCLOSE provisions, not that the public is uniformly opposed to them. As you note, if we were trying to skew the results, we wouldn’t have even released question 10, which shows that Americans support some level of informational disclosure.

I accept Jeff’s point that CCP wasn’t blatantly skewing the data. The poll released today did include questions/responses that didn’t back up the organization’s ideological beliefs (though I’d argue it would have been unethical to remove them). The part I continue to take issue with, however, is whether Jeff’s nugget of wisdom — “56 percent of likely voters think interest groups should be free to spend money on politics” — proves anything about support for the DISCLOSE Act.

The DISCLOSE Act, as it stands,* *does restrict political spending for certain corporations — those with foreign investment totaling more than 20 percent, those holding government contracts in excess of $10 million, and those still benefiting from the government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP). I’d argue that if you asked whether corporations with these characteristics should be spending money to influence campaigns and lobby government, the majority of Americans would say no. The larger point, however, is that the poll didn’t ask that question, and it’s a specious example of reasoning to take question five to indicate anything about popular support for the DISCLOSE Act.

Katya Ryder | School teacher, earned National Board Certification in 2013 I have a passion for science and majored in biology at Arizona State University, where I also earned teaching certificate and Master of Education

Related

$1.3 trillion in federal spending unaccounted for, report finds

Despite calls for independent bodies to keep government accountable, the Sunlight Foundation’s most recent Clearspending report has found the federal

$1.89 billion given to states to fight HIV

The federal government Monday announced more than $1.89 billion in funding to states to fight the HIV epidemic with access to care and with more cash for the failing AIDS Drug Assistance Program. According to an HHS press release , $813 million of that money will go directly to the ADAP programming. An additional $8,386,340 will be issued as a supplement to 36 states and territories currently facing a litany of unmet needs and access issues.

1 Brigade and 1 Battalion

ISTANBUL – It’s 10 p.m. in the lowest level of the Istanbul airport. In 20 minutes I’ll be allowed to board my plane to Kabul, bringing me to the

1. Brian Schweitzer

As governor of Montana, Schweitzer doesn’t represent one of the most highly populated, high-profile electoral states in the country. But this

#1 in Conspiracy Theories

Andrew Young’s tell-all biography of John Edwards, hitting shelves next week, is surging in one Amazon.com category in particular. #1 in Conspiracy

$1 Million for Toomey

Pat Toomey, the former Club for Growth president and leading Republican candidate in Pennsylvania’s 2010 Senate race, has announced a $1 million haul in the

$1 Trillion for Fannie and Freddie?

That is the worst-case scenario, according to Egan-Jones Ratings Co., quoted in a Bloomberg article making the rounds. The agency says that if home prices

$1.3 Million for Brown

The GOP’s candidate in the Massachusetts special election raised more than one million dollars -- double the goal -- in a 24-hour moneybomb on the Ron Paul

Ten Loopholes That Can’t Make It Into FinReg

Dan Pfeiffer, the White House communications director, wrote a blog post that lists the loopholes lobbyists most want inserted into Sen. Chris Dodd’s (D-Conn.)

Bachmann uncomfortable over earmarks ban

Republicans appear to have boxed themselves into a corner with their portrayal of earmarks as wasteful spending, as many of them have backed a moratorium on

Troubled mine holds hope for U.S. rare earth industry

China currently controls 97 percent of the world’s rare earth production. The Mountain Pass Mine could change that -- if it can overcome serious environmental concerns.

© Copyright 2022 The Washington Independent All Rights Reserved

Terms & Privacy | twi.news@washingtonindependent.com

⭐🔥 Click here to check Latest Celeb News & Celebrity Gossip in 2022! 🔥⭐