National Security Strategy Embraces Indefinite Detention Without Charge

Created: May 27, 2010 12:32 | Last updated: July 31, 2020 00:00

At the risk of sounding obsessive, look at how the National Security Strategy entrenches indefinite detention without charge.

The increased risk of terrorism necessitates a capacity to detain and interrogate suspected violent extremists, but that framework must align with our laws to be effective and sustainable. When we are able, we will prosecute terrorists in Federal courts or in reformed military commissions that are fair, legitimate, and effective. For detainees who cannot be prosecuted—but pose a danger to the American people—we must have clear, defensible, and lawful standards. We must have fair procedures and a thorough process of periodic review, so that any prolonged detention is carefully evaluated and justified. And keeping with our Constitutional system, it will be subject to checks and balances. The goal is an approach that can be sustained by future Administrations, with support from both political parties and all three branches of government.

This is actually in a section entitled “Strengthen the Power of Our Example.”