The Washington Independent
The Washington Independent

Wall Street Profits Highlight Case for Derivatives Reform

Last week, J.P. Morgan announced that it made a first-quarter profit of $3.3 billion on revenue of $28.2 billion, meaning for every dollar of business the bank

Adan Duran
News
Last updated: Jul 31, 2020 | Apr 20, 2010

Last week, J.P. Morgan announced that it made a first-quarter profit of $3.3 billion on revenue of $28.2 billion, meaning for every dollar of business the bank did, it kept 12 cents as profit. This morning, Goldman Sachs — the Wall Street giant charged by the Securities and Exchange Commission with defrauding customers with mortgage-backed financial products last week — released its first-quarter earnings statement as well. It made $3.46 billion in profit from $12.78 billion of revenue — meaning for every dollar of business it did, it kept 27 cents.

This is not quite a picture of a healthy industry. In a competitive marketplace, prices and fees at Wall Street firms should fall and margins should become thinner. On the one hand, Wall Street firms like J.P. Morgan and Goldman Sachs have seen a number of their competitors die in the past two years, and have absorbed business from the failed Lehmans and Bear Sterns of the world. But on the other hand, Wall Street profit margins have remained sky high except for a short blip during the worst of the credit crunch. And, an economist would tell you, such sustained levels of high profitability point to anti-competitive behavior.

Consider another high-profit company in a competitive industry — say, Exxon Mobil. Last year, it made about $19 billion in profit on $300 billion in turnover, giving it a margin of six percent. WalMart? It is in the low-margin grocery and retail business, and managed a profit margin of around 3.5 percent. In the first quarter, Goldman’s margin was just two percentage points below Google’s — and consider how dominant Google is in its industry.

In short, the profits point to a lack of competition. That is one thing the Dodd bill — via derivatives regulation — attempts to fix. Right now, Wall Street firms do not bid for big derivatives contracts — they simply quote a price and work over-the-counter. For that reason, derivatives are wildly profitable for the companies. The Dodd bill will force derivatives pricing to become public to the market, driving down margins as companies compete.

Recently, J.P. Morgan’s chairman, Jamie Dimon, put a number on how much that might cost his firm — $700 million to a “couple” billion dollars — less than a quarter or a tenth of his company’s annual profits.

Adan Duran | Adan is a high-energy keynote speaker who encourages audiences to use their focus to pay attention to what matters most at work and in life. His audience members adore his realistic techniques that they can use in their personal and professional lives. As a professional speaker, he has won several awards. His extensive experience in learning, growth, and leading large corporate teams makes his an ideal candidate. Employers recruit Adan because of his actionable techniques for avoiding disruptions, stopping interruptions, prioritizing everyday objectives, and saying no to demands that divert resources away from actual goals and priorities.

Related

Rep. Paul Ryan to deliver SOTU response

Chairman of the House Budget Committee Rep. Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) will deliver the Republican response to the State of the Union Tuesday, according to Mike Allen

Rep. Paulsen allies with medical device industry to relax FDA oversight

Source: Flickr; Republicanconference (www.flickr.com/photos/republicanconference) On the heels of the Minnesota Independent story last week about U.S. Rep. Erik Paulsen’s cozy financial relationship with the medical device industry, the New York Times reported Tuesday that some health professionals are alarmed by Paulsen’s push to relax Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversight

Rep. Paulsen touts balanced budget constitutional amendment

In a post for the conservative blog True North , U.S. Rep

Rep. Patrick McHenry: Please, Conservatives, Fill Out Your Census Forms!

The conservative congressman from North Carolina, a constant critic of the census -- one of the people who sounded the alarm about politicization when the

Rep. Paulsen, Karl Rove the latest to get ‘glittered’

Rep. Erik Paulsen and former Bush staffer Karl Rove were both showered with glitter at the Midwest Leadership Conference Friday

Rep. Perlmutter to hold constituent meet-up in grocery store

Colorado Congressman Ed Perlmutter will hold a Government in the Grocery constituent meet-up this evening from 5-7 at the Safeway at 38th and Wadsworth in Wheat Ridge. The address is 3900 Wadsworth. The meeting, where Perlmutter typically sits at a folding table and talks to whomever shows up, is free and open to the public

Rep. Perlmutter criticizes House measure that would eliminate 800K federal jobs

Congressman Ed Perlmutter today issued a scathing statement criticizing the House of Representatives for passing a spending bill that could put nearly a million federal employees out of work. The Colorado delegation voted strictly on party lines, with all four Republicans voting in favor of the bill and the three Democrats voting in opposition. Perlmutter’s statement: “My number one priority is to get people back to work because that’s the best thing we can do to pay our debt and move forward toward economic stability

Rep. Pete Stark Won’t Dignify Constituent by, er, Micturating Upon His Leg

In the tradition of Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), California Democratic Rep. Pete Stark revealed at a recent town hall gathering that there are limits to what

Rep. Peace, ACLU seek investigation of soldier’s allegations of racial discrimination in Afghanistan

Both Rep. Steve Pearce (R-NM) and the American Civil Liberties Union agree: There needs to be an investigation into Spc.

© Copyright 2021 The Washington Independent All Rights Reserved

Terms & Privacy | twi.news@washingtonindependent.com