U.S. Accepts Responsibility for Khost Civilian Casualties

By
Thursday, April 09, 2009 at 10:23 am

In fairness, this was a rapidly issued apology (near-apology?) by U.S. Forces-Afghanistan. Here’s the statement in full, which I received 20 minutes ago:

Coalition Forces offer condolences following non-combatant deaths in Khost

KABUL, Afghanistan – Further inquiries into the Coalition and ANSF operation in Khost earlier today suggest that the people killed and wounded were not enemy combatants as previously reported.

During the operation to capture militants linked to insurgent activities in the area, a local family near the targeted enemy’s location fired upon the combined forces. The combined forces returned fire, killing two males, two females and wounding two females. There are reports of an infant also killed.

Coalition and Afghan forces do not believe that this family was involved with militant activities and that they were defending their home against an unknown threat.

The joint investigation will continue.

Coalition forces are working closely with local Afghan officials and family members to express condolences and provide assistance in the aftermath of this tragic event.

“We deeply regret the tragic loss of life in this precious family. Words alone cannot begin to express our regret and sympathy and we will ensure the surviving family members are properly cared for,” said Brig. Gen. Michael A. Ryan, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan.

I’m still unclear as to whether the policy is to apologize first or investigate first; it seems to be the latter. Still, this release, accepting responsibility for the civilian deaths, came barely four hours after USFOR-A’s announcement than an investigation had begun.

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Comments

16 Comments

Third World John
Comment posted April 9, 2009 @ 8:22 am

First – Bee-atches


Third World John
Comment posted April 9, 2009 @ 8:25 am

Second too, bee-atches


AFGHANISTAN: Handling Civilian Casualties and their Aftermath Is a Critical Failure « War Victims Monitor
Pingback posted April 13, 2009 @ 9:34 am

[...] it with all of this in mind that I was just puzzled at Spencer Ackerman’s seeming comfort with both investigating civilian casualties and simply apologizing for them carte blanche. Neither [...]


Our Journey to Smile
Comment posted April 21, 2009 @ 1:34 am

US regrets civilian deaths : Our Great Deception

Human civilization in this Age of Technological Terror has perfected a deep-rooted Culture of War, founded on pride, hate and finances, so another ONE death means relatively and absolutely NOTHING, in the midst of a Great Deception that believes naively that our children can find safe zones in shelling, creativity in cluster ammunition, humanity in human shields, mercy in manipulative politics, reliability in rhetoric, help in hurling even more money and sigh..a Great Sigh, dignity in the destruction of fellow human beings.

Peace!
http://ourjourneytosmile.com/blog


Killing Civilians: Questions to Ask in the Dead of Night?
Pingback posted April 25, 2009 @ 2:16 pm

[...] accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology [...]


Video: Killing Civilians: How Safe Do You Actually Want to Be?
Pingback posted April 27, 2009 @ 10:31 am

[...] accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology: “Further inquiries into the Coalition and ANSF operation in Khost earlier today suggest that [...]


Killing Civilians: How Safe Do You Actually Want to Be? « Rethink Afghanistan
Pingback posted April 27, 2009 @ 10:40 am

[...] accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology: “Further inquiries into the Coalition and ANSF operation in Khost earlier today suggest that [...]


“Questions to Ask in the Dead of Night” « Fabius Maximus
Pingback posted April 29, 2009 @ 8:02 am

[...] accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology: “Further inquiries into the Coalition and ANSF operation in Khost earlier today suggest that [...]


mobilityscooter
Comment posted April 29, 2009 @ 11:45 am

Then what's next. Is apologizing enough? nyahhh….why is history repeating itself? Innocent civilian casualties again and again…no stopping unless the leaders will stop their pride.


Killing Civilians: How Safe Do You Actually Want to Be? « Get Afghanistan Right
Pingback posted April 30, 2009 @ 2:04 pm

[...] accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology: “Further inquiries into the Coalition and ANSF operation in Khost earlier today suggest that [...]


Questions to Ask in the Dead of Night « Wonders of Pakistan
Pingback posted May 7, 2009 @ 6:23 am

[...] In accordance with its new policy, the U.S. issued an apology: [...]


Atrocities in Afghanistan: A Troubling Timetable / Waging Nonviolence
Pingback posted April 30, 2010 @ 1:37 pm

[...] that the four people killed by troops were “armed militants.” Later that same day another statement admits that further inquiries “suggest that the people killed and wounded were not enemy [...]


Atrocities in Afghanistan: A Troubling Timetable. By Kathy Kelly and Dan Pearson « Kanan48
Pingback posted May 1, 2010 @ 4:32 am

[...] killed by troops were “armed militants.” Later that same day [another statement] (http://washingtonindependent.com/38058/us-accepts-responsibility-for-khost-civilian-casualties) admits that further inquiries “suggest that the people killed and wounded were not enemy [...]


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Pingback posted May 2, 2010 @ 7:15 pm

[...] children, men and women – not merely slaughtered but, in death, tarred with the brush of suspicion. The mainstream [...]


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Pingback posted May 3, 2010 @ 9:56 pm

[...] that the four people killed by troops were “armed militants.” Later that same day another statement admitted that further inquiries “suggest that the people killed and wounded were not enemy [...]


3976874
Comment posted September 7, 2011 @ 12:46 pm

3976874 beers on the wall. sck was here


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