RNC Debate: Round II

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Monday, January 05, 2009 at 1:36 pm

The lightning round begins: Who is everyone’s favorite Republican president? Reagan. Reagan. Reagan. Reagan. Reagan. And finally, from Ken Blackwell: “Ronald Reagan, who brought me into the Republican party.”

“Good,” says Norquist. “Everyone got that one right.”

Who’s everyone’s least favorite Republican president? Steele and Saltsman pass. Dawson suggests Warren G. Harding. Blackwell nominates Herbert Hoover, “who opened the door to big government.”

Next question: How many guns does everyone own? Blackwell owns seven, which he uses “very well,” and Saltsman rapid-fire lists the guns he owns, ending with a 30 ought 6. “And Ken, I’ll take you on any time.” He means hunting, not dueling, I think.

Steele takes a technology question and makes it rhetorical: What do we stand for? “My momma was a sharecropper’s daughter,” says Steele, “who watched her son become lieutenant governor of Maryland.” The GOP needs to be the party of ambition and individual freedom. A little later, Saltsman raises the same issue. “The Obama administration is going to decide whether you’re a winner or a loser,” he says, by becoming the party of entitlements and bailouts.

Before the debate began, Ron Paul supporters had found the web site where they could submit questions and deluged it. One of their questions gets in: What will the candidates do to keep the r3VOLution going? The candidates all pledge to try.

“We can’t just include people who pass our personal litmus tests,” says Steele.

“I saw the Paul movement in my state,” says Dawson. “We’re a party that needs excitement, and people painting their cars, and putting signs on overpasses.”

“I’ve been to their picnics,” says Anuzis.

“I personally have met with Ron Paul on two occasions,” says Duncan. “I have treated his foot soldiers with respect.”

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The Washington Independent » RNC Debate: Round II
Pingback posted January 5, 2009 @ 2:44 pm

[...] Original post by unknown [...]


Buddy
Comment posted January 5, 2009 @ 7:45 pm

Unfortunately watched the “debate” on C-Span conducted by Norquist(the one who wants to drown govt in a tub). All these guys believe the reason they lost the election was because they did not get their message out enough! Wow.


White Hat
Comment posted January 5, 2009 @ 9:45 pm

What was that evil boob Norquist doing there? Hasn't the GOP had enough of lying incompetent neocons?


Mark
Comment posted January 6, 2009 @ 7:07 am

Actually, Grover Norquist IS the Republican Party. Which is exactly why they're screwed.


Run Up The Score
Comment posted January 6, 2009 @ 7:17 am

But seriously, guys, what do you think about Ronald Reagan? You have to love that there was no other acceptable answer.


Arthur
Comment posted January 6, 2009 @ 8:45 am

Obama is good, he's made Lincoln a Democrat! Or was it done by these Republicans?


mike
Comment posted January 6, 2009 @ 9:21 am

2006… they just don't get it… 2008…they just don't get it…and so on, and so on, and so on…With the information age in full swing, it's harder for them to control their messages of misinformation and outright lies. This is why they lose elections. Their platform is based on greed and wealth for corps. and the very rich. America be damned. Just so long as the republican party can grab control so that donors can be rewarded. That has become the main purpose of the GOP. Given a choice, most informed Americans will chose the Dems, mostly because a vote for a third party sadly is a boon for the crooked GOP.


Igor Sill
Comment posted February 22, 2009 @ 11:09 am

Let me also chime in with Reagan as the greatest President of our time, both Democrate and Republican. I'm hoping that today's Democratic majority will explore the similarities in Reaganomics with our current economic state, and act wisely.

In the last year of the Carter Administration (1980) the US inflation rate climbed to a peak of 14.8%, the top individual tax payer rate was 78%, unemployment was 7.4%, federal outlay was 17% higher than the economy''s growth rate, and the federal government grew while enacting loads of new spending programs. During this period, the US economy was then truly the worst it has ever been since the Great Depression of the 1030s. The nation was in quite a deep hole of economic collapse when the new president Ronald Reagan took office in January of 1981. Reagan had to devise a constructive, sound tax and monetary policy to pull the US out of its horrific economic low point, very similar to what we find ourselves in today.

Stephen Moore of the Cato Institute stated that “no act in the last quarter century had a more profound impact on the US economy of the eighties and nineties than the Reagan tax cut of 1981.” Reagan''s tax cuts, combined with an emphasis on federal monetary policy, deregulation, and expansion of free trade created a sustained economic expansion?creating America''s greatest sustained wave of prosperity ever. Our economy grew by more than a third in size, producing a $15 trillion increase in American wealth. Every income group, from the richest, middle class and poorest in this country, grew its income (1981-1989). Cutting federal income taxes, cutting the US government spending budget, cutting useless programs, scaling down the government work force, maintaining low interest rates, and keeping a watchful inflation hedge on the monetary supply was Ronald Reagan''s formula for a successful economic turnaround. The Nation reacted with new found confidence. I realize that Reagan was a former Democrat, turned Republican, but above all he was focused on doing the right things for the US economy, and he got it right. We might wish to incorporate and apply some “Reaganomics” to our current economic dilemma.
Igor Sill
The Royal Economics Society member
Oxford University, MBA


Igor Sill
Comment posted February 22, 2009 @ 7:09 pm

Let me also chime in with Reagan as the greatest President of our time, both Democrate and Republican. I'm hoping that today's Democratic majority will explore the similarities in Reaganomics with our current economic state, and act wisely.

In the last year of the Carter Administration (1980) the US inflation rate climbed to a peak of 14.8%, the top individual tax payer rate was 78%, unemployment was 7.4%, federal outlay was 17% higher than the economy''s growth rate, and the federal government grew while enacting loads of new spending programs. During this period, the US economy was then truly the worst it has ever been since the Great Depression of the 1030s. The nation was in quite a deep hole of economic collapse when the new president Ronald Reagan took office in January of 1981. Reagan had to devise a constructive, sound tax and monetary policy to pull the US out of its horrific economic low point, very similar to what we find ourselves in today.

Stephen Moore of the Cato Institute stated that “no act in the last quarter century had a more profound impact on the US economy of the eighties and nineties than the Reagan tax cut of 1981.” Reagan''s tax cuts, combined with an emphasis on federal monetary policy, deregulation, and expansion of free trade created a sustained economic expansion?creating America''s greatest sustained wave of prosperity ever. Our economy grew by more than a third in size, producing a $15 trillion increase in American wealth. Every income group, from the richest, middle class and poorest in this country, grew its income (1981-1989). Cutting federal income taxes, cutting the US government spending budget, cutting useless programs, scaling down the government work force, maintaining low interest rates, and keeping a watchful inflation hedge on the monetary supply was Ronald Reagan''s formula for a successful economic turnaround. The Nation reacted with new found confidence. I realize that Reagan was a former Democrat, turned Republican, but above all he was focused on doing the right things for the US economy, and he got it right. We might wish to incorporate and apply some “Reaganomics” to our current economic dilemma.
Igor Sill
The Royal Economics Society member
Oxford University, MBA


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Comment posted May 28, 2011 @ 1:04 am

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